CSP Application FAQ

1.     How can I submit questions prior to applying?

Most questions can be answered by reviewing the application process on this page, the FAQs, and the attachments: How to Earn Your CSP, and the Applicant Checklist. For questions not answered on this page, email CSPadmin@NSAspeaker.org.

2.  When can I apply?

The application will be available on September 4, 2020; applications may be started at that time. Applications are due no later than Monday, January 11, 2021, by 11:59 p.m. PST.  No exceptions will be granted.

3. What does an application consist of?

  • Payment
  • Application
  • Supporting documents
    • Employer Letter(s) of Verification (for presentations made as a salaried/contracted employee)
    • Additional documentation for self-sponsored events, such as marketing collateral
  • Additional written business model clarification, as necessary or requested

4. How much does it cost?

The 2021 non-refundable application fee is $375.

5. How do I pay the fee?

An invoice of $375 will be added to your NSA account within three business days of submitting your application form, or you can call NSA HQ at 480-968-2552 to make a payment. Your application will be reviewed once payment is received.

6. If I have had a membership lapse within the last 12 months, do I qualify to apply?

No. Twelve months of continuous membership (between January 10, 2020, and January 10, 2021) in NSA or one of the Global Speakers Federation (GSF) member associations is required. Lapsed NSA/GSF membership will result in your application being denied or not put forward. Please ensure that your membership is current before applying.  Questions may be directed to NSA by email (CSPadmin@nsaspeaker.org) or by phone (1-480-968-2552).    

7. If my application is incomplete or doesn’t meet requirements, can I resubmit?

Once your application has been submitted, it cannot be edited or re-submitted in the same application year.

8. I have not attended a live NSA or GSF event in the past 10 years. Does a recording purchase count?

In-person attendance at one live NSA or GSF national event is an application requirement. Note that virtual events hosted by NSA / GSF in calendar year 2020 / 2021 qualify.

9. I purchased and listened to required session recordings two years ago. Does that count?

No. Applicants must watch the the most recently recorded videos of all three required educational sessions How to Earn Your CSP, Business Ethics, and Professional Competencies. You can view these videos in NSA OnDemand at no cost. Completion of these sessions is part of the application process.

10. Is there a minimum length for presentations?

Presentations must be a minimum of 30 minutes long

11. For what years can I include presentations?

Documenting a total of 250 paid presentations is critical for demonstrating professional competence. To meet the presentation count, a 10-year span from January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2020 may be used.

12. Do presentations qualify if they were made when I wasn’t a member of either NSA or a GSF association?

Presentations made as a non-member qualify if they fit within the qualifying date range.

13. Will $50,000 annual average income for five years fulfill all my application requirements?

No. In addition to listing a minimum of 250 paid presentations, show income of $50,000 per year for at least five of the eligible years (not an average).

14. Once I meet both requirements of 250 qualifying paid presentations and annual presentation income of $50,000 or more for five separate qualifying years, do I still have to list 10 years of presentations?

A speaker may meet the requirements of presentation count and income in five years. Some speakers may need to use up to 10 years to document presentation count. All 10 years used must be documented in terms of income.

15. Do product sales at a presentation count as speaking income?

Yes, they do. Income earned from any service or product purchased the day of the live presentation before midnight may be counted.

16. Do presentations I sponsor myself count?

Yes, they do. Include print or digital promotional items such as flyers, screen shots, or brochures as supporting documentation. These materials must include the date of the event, your name as presenter, the topic of the presentation, and the cost to the attendee.

17. Do my speaking engagements as a salaried or contracted employee qualify?

Yes. Speakers who are salaried or contracted employees must document fees by using the percentage of their gross annual salary dedicated to live presenting divided by the number of presentations given per each of the qualifying years. For example, as a professor, if you have $100,000 annual salary and spend 50% of your time on stage during the given year, $50,000 can be applied toward your application. If during that year, you delivered 100 presentations, you would show each presentation had a “fee paid” or income earned of $500 (i.e., $50,000 from speaking divided by 100 presentations=$500 per presentation).

18. As a salaried/contracted applicant, can time spent developing content for live presentations qualify as paid presenting?

No. For salaried/contracted applicants, earnings can only be calculated for the percentage of time spent presenting to live audiences.

19. Do I need additional documentation as a salaried applicant?

Salaried or contracted speakers must provide an Employer Verification letter from an immediate supervisor on company letterhead that verifies the applicant’s:

  • Position with the company
  • Years of employment for each of the qualifying years included in the Presentation Spreadsheet
  • Gross salary for each of the qualifying years included in the Presentation Spreadsheet
  • Percentage of the employee’s time dedicated to live presenting in front of a live audience; research, travel, and other preparation time do not count toward this percentage.

20. Can my staff or someone else complete my application on my behalf?

Yes, but content and accuracy of your application are solely the applicant’s responsibility.

21. Do evaluations from all my clients qualify, even if they are not listed on my application material?

The names of those to whom you send client evaluations should appear on your spreadsheet.

22. How many client evaluators may I submit?

Twenty is required and an unlimited number may be submitted.

23. Is there a low-end limit to the fee paid for a qualifying presentation?

Unpaid or very low-paid presentations do not qualify. Fees must be consistent with your usual fee. Qualifying presentations show fees that are consistent or increasing as a sign of professional growth. Including low fees (e.g., less than $100) calls into question a speaker’s presentation count for purposes of the CSP application.

24. I am an international presenter and I am not paid in U.S. dollars. How should I show this?

Add a column to the spreadsheet next to U.S. Dollars to show your earnings in the currency paid. Do not convert income to U.S. dollars on the presentation spreadsheet.

25.  I am an international applicant and my best presentation is in another language. Can I use this?

Non-English speakers must provide a written transcript in English of the audio track. Videos will be reviewed by speakers of your language when possible.

26. Is there a video length requirement?

Applicants for the Class of 2021 have two options, as follows:

  1. Option One: Submit two 30-minute videos
  2. Option Two: Submit one 60-minute video

They must meet the length requirement. Long introductions of you as the speaker do not count toward time limit. Videos of virtual sessions presented in calendar year 2020 will qualify if the reviewers see evidence of an audience.

27. Can I edit my video?

Editing is not required.

28. Who reviews the video(s)?

NSA selects the video reviewers from a pool of current CSPs members of NSA or GSF Associations who are in good standing.

29.  How important is my video submission?

Your video represents your best work. If you are a keynoter, submit a video of your keynote. If you are a trainer, submit a training session. Videos that do not successfully demonstrate platform skills, expertise, eloquence, or ethics are the most frequent reason for application denial.